Nano-

Put Nano- in front of any science and you get a whole new field!

244 notes

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Rogue waves—individual, isolated waves far larger than the surrounding waves—were reported for centuries by sailors. But their stories of massive walls of water appearing in the open ocean were not corroborated until 1995 when a rogue wave struck an offshore platform. How these giant waves form is still under active research, but one leading theory is that nonlinear interactions between waves allow one wave to sap energy from surrounding waves and focus it into one much larger, short-lived wave. I first learned of rogue waves during a seminar in graduate school. At the time, this idea of nonlinear focusing had only been explored in simulation, but a few years later a research group was able to demonstrate the effect in a wave tank, as shown in the video above. Wait for the end, and you’ll notice how the rogue wave that takes down the ship is much larger than its predecessors. For more on rogue waves and their mind-boggling behavior, be sure to check my previous post on the subject.  (Video credit: A. Chabchoub, N. Hoffmann, and N. Akhmediev)

Watch the video. Have we ever steered you wrong before? It’s 45 seconds of your day.

(via monstruosotano)

681 notes

scienceyoucanlove:

“A team of researchers from Temple University of Medicine, US have made a significant breakthrough on the path towards a permanent cure for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) by designing a way to cut out integrated HIV-1 genes from human cells.”Further details:L#1: http://is.gd/yYjpxcL#2: http://is.gd/0oWb8mL#3: http://is.gd/GdqsZGImage via: Fine art America
through Hashem AL-ghaili

scienceyoucanlove:

“A team of researchers from Temple University of Medicine, US have made a significant breakthrough on the path towards a permanent cure for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) by designing a way to cut out integrated HIV-1 genes from human cells.”

Further details:

L#1: http://is.gd/yYjpxc
L#2: http://is.gd/0oWb8m
L#3: http://is.gd/GdqsZG

Image via: Fine art America

through Hashem AL-ghaili

(via s-c-i-guy)

7,805 notes

smartercities:

Meet The 14-Year-Old Girl Who Developed A Low-Cost Water Purification System | FastCompany
The next generation of scientists is already hard at work solving our biggest problems. Take Deepika Kurup, a 14-year-old high school student from Nashua, New Hampshire. After seeing children in India drinking dirty water from a stagnant pool, she decided, in her words, “to find a solution to the global water crisis.” And then she actually made some progress towards that goal, developing a solar-powered water purification system.

smartercities:

Meet The 14-Year-Old Girl Who Developed A Low-Cost Water Purification System | FastCompany

The next generation of scientists is already hard at work solving our biggest problems. Take Deepika Kurup, a 14-year-old high school student from Nashua, New Hampshire. After seeing children in India drinking dirty water from a stagnant pool, she decided, in her words, “to find a solution to the global water crisis.” And then she actually made some progress towards that goal, developing a solar-powered water purification system.

15,831 notes

jtotheizzoe:

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

This is the most adorable experiment that has ever been done.

I can appreciate the ethical conundrum here. But I am also fascinated by the science.