Nano-

Put Nano- in front of any science and you get a whole new field!

39 notes

mystiquemonique asked: hello, do ants have dicks? i need to know asap

You know what…I didn’t know, so I went to look it up and I don’t think Wikipedia is aware of the comedy goldmine that is ant mating. Strap in, cursing probable definite.

image

So ants have queen ants. The lady ant all the other ants want to get with. The Natalie Dormer of the ant world. Queenie lays eggs. If they’re fertilised, they become males, if not, females. If they’re not that well fed, the females become worker ants and if they’re well fed, they become queens. Then the fucking awful day begins.

As the pupate to grow their wings, the males are, and I quote the greatest sentence on wikipedia: “quickly converted into single-purpose sexual missiles" Just like humans in a nightclub. What the fuck nature?

image

The males and the virgin queens sprout wings because ants aren’t annoying enough and take flight to do the aerial bouncy-bouncy. It’s called the nuptial flight.

The males are idiots. Super idiots. As in they can’t feed themselves, they’re just programmed to mate and do it, so to answer your question (you asked for this) I again quote: ”the male literally explodes his internal genitalia into the genital chamber of the queen and quickly dies.” So no, they just have claspy type things to grip onto the female. What the fuck, nature?

The new queens then fly off and start a new colony, using what the male gave them whenever they decide they want a new male ant. Ah, the miracle of life.

That was an interesting way to procrastinate. With ant sex.

87 notes

So, we’re all doomed. We had a good run.
A group of researchers in Harvard have created 1000+ robots called Kilobots.
The Kilobots are able to assemble themselves into shapes given to them as images by the researchers. Give 1000 people and tell them to get into a certain shape, you’d be there for weeks.
They do it by starting with a seed of 4 robots that say where the shape is going to go. The robots have an infra-red diode and can measure how far away the others are by the reflected light. The others then move around the the shape hugging the edges, and then they stop when they bump into another robot or find they’re about to pointlessly leave the shape. And then they make stuff.
Imaging if we could do it with teeny tiny robots. We’d have shape changing robots, and then we’d have the evil Terminator in Terminator 2. Or more likely this could have massive effects in engineering and working in dangerous places

So, we’re all doomed. We had a good run.

A group of researchers in Harvard have created 1000+ robots called Kilobots.

The Kilobots are able to assemble themselves into shapes given to them as images by the researchers. Give 1000 people and tell them to get into a certain shape, you’d be there for weeks.

They do it by starting with a seed of 4 robots that say where the shape is going to go. The robots have an infra-red diode and can measure how far away the others are by the reflected light. The others then move around the the shape hugging the edges, and then they stop when they bump into another robot or find they’re about to pointlessly leave the shape. And then they make stuff.

Imaging if we could do it with teeny tiny robots. We’d have shape changing robots, and then we’d have the evil Terminator in Terminator 2. Or more likely this could have massive effects in engineering and working in dangerous places

885 notes

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

A Leidenfrost droplet impregnated with hydrophilic beads hovers on a thin film of its own vapor. The Leidenfrost effect occurs when a liquid touches a solid surface much, much hotter than its boiling point. Instead of boiling entirely away, part of the liquid vaporizes and the remaining liquid survives for extended periods while the vapor layer insulates it from the hot surface. Hydrophilic beads inserted into Leidenfrost water droplets initially sink and are completely enveloped by the liquid. But, as the drop evaporates, the beads self-organize, forming a monolayer that coats the surface of the drop. The outer surface of the beads drys out, trapping the beads and causing the evaporation rate to slow because less liquid is exposed. (Photo credit: L. Maquet et al.; research paper - pdf)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

A Leidenfrost droplet impregnated with hydrophilic beads hovers on a thin film of its own vapor. The Leidenfrost effect occurs when a liquid touches a solid surface much, much hotter than its boiling point. Instead of boiling entirely away, part of the liquid vaporizes and the remaining liquid survives for extended periods while the vapor layer insulates it from the hot surface. Hydrophilic beads inserted into Leidenfrost water droplets initially sink and are completely enveloped by the liquid. But, as the drop evaporates, the beads self-organize, forming a monolayer that coats the surface of the drop. The outer surface of the beads drys out, trapping the beads and causing the evaporation rate to slow because less liquid is exposed. (Photo credit: L. Maquet et al.; research paper - pdf)

(via existentialismandmakeup)

44 notes

diracpointless:

shychemist:

Hi Shychemist! I am a female graduate student in physics and I wanted to know if you can help me?

I am doing an informal poll mainly since I am curious. This is for any women who have ever pursued physics, even if you didn’t finish (you could have declared freshman year and then changed after a semester or two, it doesn’t matter). Please answer the following by sending me a PM at nonlinearfluctuations

Everyone else, please boost if you think you have followers who are women in physics.

1. Have you completed a physics degree? (If yes go to q5)
2. If not, why not?
3. If not, what did you switch to?
4. If not, at what point did you switch?
5. How far did you go? (Ie, did you go to grad school? Post doc? Professor? Are you still working on a physics degree?)
6. What are your plans after you finish your degree?
7. Is there anything you felt like your experience in physics was lacking?
8. Is there anything you felt like was deterring you from physics?
9. Is there anything you felt like had you had you would have continued (if you stopped already) or you wish you had?
10. Did your school have a Society of Physics Students organization and if so did you attend/feel welcomed?
11. Did your school have a Women in Physics organization and if so were you active in it?
12. Anything else you would like to comment on or say? Important info that you think I should know?
13. If I come up with more questions in the future, can I send you a message? (by whatever you think is most convenient)

Addendum:
14. Did you do research and if so did you have a good relationship with your research advisor?
15. Did you have another sort of advisor (academic/mentor etc?) and how was your relationship with them?
16. Are there any other minority groups that you are part of?

Also feel free to skip questions if you want to.

***NOTE: I will not post your PMs unless for some reason you tell me you want me (like you feel other people can get something valuable from your responses.

This is only because I want to know why women choose to leave or stay in physics.

Thanks so much to everyone who answers or boosts this!

Signal Boost!

1. Yes

5. I am currently a post grad

6. Either do a post doc, go into science communication, or both

7. Post docs in my group (my group is quite small and getting smaller)

8. No

9. See 7.

10. We had a Phys Soc and they were so lovely and welcoming that I always felt vaguely guilty if I couldn’t attend an event

11. Yes. WISER. I attended a few seminars and once spoke on a panel with the director, but I was there with a different group. It’s nice to know they are there if I need them.

12. If I continue in the institution I am in I will probably get more involved with WISER

14. The relationship between student and advisor is often strained. But he has never treated me any differently from his other students. I respect him for that.

15. I had a project supervisor in undergraduate whose life I wish to emulate. She’s fantastic.

16. I am Irish, if that counts. In Ireland though - so pretty strong majority there.

I did the thing.

44 notes

http://adventuresinchemistry.tumblr.com/post/95318041839/shychemist-hi-shychemist-i-am-a-female

shychemist:

Hi Shychemist! I am a female graduate student in physics and I wanted to know if you can help me?

I am doing an informal poll mainly since I am curious. This is for any women who have ever pursued physics, even if you didn’t finish (you could have declared freshman year and…


If you can do the thing you should do thing.

I can’t do the thing. You should.

Lnr: (from holidays on phone)
1.

(Source: shychemist)

521 notes

wildcat2030:

This is what your home on Mars could look like -NASA JPL and Makerbot have announced the winners of their Thingiverse Mars Base challenge to design and 3D print a human habitat for the Red Planet. - Humans living on Mars is a fascinating concept. We already have Mars One looking to establish a Mars colony, and NASA planning manned missions to the Red Planet, with one objective being to assess the feasibility of living there; whether Mars has the resources necessary for human survival, and whether we have the technology to create what we need. While, however, it’s still a distant dream, that hasn’t stopped people from thinking about how we might live if we get there. Recently, NASA and Makerbot held the Mars Base challenge: to design human habitation, using materials either found on Mars or brought from Earth, that could be 3D printed. With 228 submissions on Thingiverse, the competition was fierce — but the three top designs are in, with the first place winner receiving a MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D printer and spools of MakerBot PLA filament going to second and third. (via This is what your home on Mars could look like - CNET)

Hexagons are bestagons. Graphene in the house! (I’m very tired)

wildcat2030:

This is what your home on Mars could look like
-
NASA JPL and Makerbot have announced the winners of their Thingiverse Mars Base challenge to design and 3D print a human habitat for the Red Planet.
-
Humans living on Mars is a fascinating concept. We already have Mars One looking to establish a Mars colony, and NASA planning manned missions to the Red Planet, with one objective being to assess the feasibility of living there; whether Mars has the resources necessary for human survival, and whether we have the technology to create what we need. While, however, it’s still a distant dream, that hasn’t stopped people from thinking about how we might live if we get there. Recently, NASA and Makerbot held the Mars Base challenge: to design human habitation, using materials either found on Mars or brought from Earth, that could be 3D printed. With 228 submissions on Thingiverse, the competition was fierce — but the three top designs are in, with the first place winner receiving a MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D printer and spools of MakerBot PLA filament going to second and third. (via This is what your home on Mars could look like - CNET)

Hexagons are bestagons. Graphene in the house! (I’m very tired)

583 notes

txchnologist:

Graphene-Based Artificial Retina Sensor Being Developed

Researchers at Germany’s Technical University of Munich are developing graphene sensors like the ones depicted above to serve as artificial retinas. The atom-thick sheet of linked carbon atoms is being used because it is thin, flexible, stronger than steel, transparent and electrically conductive. 

TUM physicists think that all of these characteristics and graphene’s compatibility with the body make it a strong contender to serve as the interface between a retinal prosthetic that converts light to electric impulses and the optic nerve. A graphene-based sensor could help blind people with healthy nerve tissue see, they say.

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